Wine with egg or wine with milk…

On 30 June 2012 a new law went into effect that compels wine producers to indicate on their labels whether albumin or caseinate were used in the wine-production process, products that, according to the European authority, can cause allergic reactions.

Thus we must write “contains eggs and egg-derivatives” and “contains milk and milk-derivatives”. But in your opinion does it make sense to write “contains milk” on a bottle of wine? I am also perplexed about the allergic effects, considering that at most I add two egg whites for every 100 litres of wine, which for the most part becomes sediment and the other part is blocked by filters if one decides to employ this practice. Which in turn raises the question: how much albumin really remains in the wine? The label notice is required for 0.25 mg/l; the analysis of my Barolo, shown in the image below, is equal to zero… And to think that the EFSA took three years to come to a decision about this pseudo-problem…

My conclusion is that, as always, the real crud, like aromatized tannins, gum arabic, etc., that the wine industry puts on the market is never called into question.

Perhaps everyone should be obligated to provide a nice added-products label? It would help us to understand a lot of things about wine and wine producers in a more simple way. I continue to use fresh egg albumin and gel bentonite (a clay), which I deem the best natural clarifiers for my Nebbiolos

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