Clarification using egg whites


Technically, egg white has tannin softening properties in wine-making. It make the tannin less astringent. The egg white induces the precipitation of possible protinaeous suspensions and assists the fining of the wine. Clarification is a procedure which is carried out some weeks before bottling. The egg white has a slight scent which does not interfere with the wine’s olfactory characteristics. Once upon a time ox blood was also used, but for obvious reasons of smell, it has been long abandoned as a procedure. One to two egg whites are used to clarify every 100 litres of wine. Once the egg whites have been gently whisked, they are added to the wine over several minutes homogenising it. After a week, clarification will have been achieved. Proteins, excess tannins will precipitate with the egg whites to the bottom of the vat, becoming a sediment. The wine at the top of the vat is subsequently pumped off, leaving the sediment at the bottom. The wine will be soon ready for bottling. But I forgot something – what do we do with the egg yolks?
I have the good luck to a super Mum who is great in the kitchen and who knows how to make an egg omelette to die for, using a slurp or two of red wine. The egg whites are used in the winery, the yolks in the kitchen …